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African Jewish Communities
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Communities - Beth Avraham of Ethiopia

Community's own websites                                                                                                       

http://enszo.org/ ()

http://bethshalombz.org/ (Beth Shalom B’nai Zaken Ethiopian Hebrew Congregation - Chicago,USA)

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Other links for this Community                                                                                                  

 

A Buried Secret

image: Potter's HandsAs the evening sun slipped behind the mountains surrounding the Ethiopian capital of Addis Ababa, Aselef grabbed my hand and pulled me through the dark, stone corridors between the houses. A narrow, metal doorway stood before us. We quietly entered as a faint, flickering light pierced the surrounding darkness. There, far beyond the noise of the crowded streets, a door slowly opened to reveal one lone menorah and a group of Ethiopian men wearing kippot inside a small, unpretentious structure. With warm smiles spread across their faces, these young members of the Ethiopian North Shewa Zionist Organization stood and greeted us, ushering us in to their humble place of worship.

This congregation is part of a new and extraordinary effort by members of an ancient Jewish community to restore their forefather’s faith, preserve their history, and reclaim their Jewish identity. They are members of Ethiopia’s Beit Avraham community (as they call themselves), seemingly a hidden enclave of the Beta Israel who have remained largely invisible to both academia and the larger Jewish world at this time. Although perhaps inclined to compare the Beit Avraham to the Falash Mura, the Beit Avraham are apparently a separate, distinct sect of the Beta Israel that rather retained ancient Jewish practices under a shroud of Ethiopian Orthodox Christianity... Read more

Source: Kulanu
 

Rabbi Paris Returns to Ethiopia After 60 Years

 

[Rabbi Hailu Paris is an Ethiopian-born rabbi of the Israelite Community. He is a graduate of Yeshiva University, teaches Talmud and Ethiopian History in the Israelite Rabbinical Academy, was the spiritual leader of Mt. Horeb E.H. Congregation in the Bronx, New York, and is a member of the International Israelite Board of Rabbis.]

Our trip to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia started on November 9th, 2005. We arrived on November 10th with the help of The Almighty safely. We checked in at the Hilton Hotel and immediately went to our rooms to get ready for the evening meal. On Friday morning, we attended the conference with a number of Christian ministers who were gathered together by Center of World Missions and the African-American Church. The purpose of this conference is to review the unique relationship that Judaism and Christianity has played in Ethiopian History.... Read more.

Source: blackjews.org - By Rabbi Hailu Paris and Monica Wiggan
 
 

The Kechene Jews of Ethiopia

Background and early history

The Jewish presence in Ethiopia was known to the world hundreds of years ago. Many travelers gave witness to their existence and Jewish emissaries tried to reach the community. The Jewish population during those centuries was clustered primarily in the northern part of the country, mostly in the vicinity of Gondar. Today, these Jews are known as Beta Israel (House of Israel, sometimes called Falasha). Over the last 30 years, the majority of them have emigrated to Eretz Yisrael.

The main purpose of this paper is to introduce a little-known Jewish community, which was once part of Beta Israel. These Jews migrated South nearly 300 years ago and settled in the central part of the region known as North Shewa. Members of this community have been known as Baliij, Teyib, Moreti (named for Moret, the area of North Shewa where they originally settled), Beit Avraham, or, most commonly, as Kechene Jews,... Read more.

 

Source: Kulanu - By Sahle Mengistu, Abraham Wondirad, Alemeshet Bayou and Rahel Alemu (November 2, 2009)
 
 
 
 
 

Ethiopia’s Kechene Jewish Community

image: Kechene Potter (Photo by Laura Alter Klapman)I had always wanted to visit Ethiopia and meet members of the Jewish community there. The closest I came, however, was in the 80’s when I met Ethiopians in Israel during the airlift and greeted them at an absorption center in Ashkelon right after they landed on Israeli soil. One of the perks, you might say, of being at the time executive director of Hadassah. However, a visit to Ethiopia itself never materialized. That fact changed in January of this year when several Kulanu board members, myself included, traveled to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, to visit the newly emerging Jewish community living in the Kechene neighborhood of the city.

When I first heard of the Kechene Jewish community, which calls itself Beit Avraham, I was intrigued. First there was Amy Cohen’s excellent article The Long Road Home in the Spring, 2009, issue of the Kulanu newsletter. Then, there was The Kechene Jews of Ethiopia, prepared last summer by members of the community who are now living in the United States. I have excerpted some paragraphs from the latter as a way to introduce them: ... Read more.


 

Source: Kulanu - by Judy Manelis, 2010
 
 
 
 
 
 

History of the Ethiopian Jewish Community

“Once they were kings. A half million strong, they matched their faith with fervor and out-matched the Moslem and Christian tribesmen around them to rule the mountain highlands around Lake Tana. They called themselves Beta Israel—the house of Israel—and used the Torah to guide their prayers and memories of the heights of Jerusalem as they lived in their thatched huts in Ethiopia.
But their neighbors called them Falashas—the alien ones, the invaders. And even three hundred years of rule, even the black features that matched those of all the people around them did not make the Jews of Ethiopia secure governors of their destiny in Africa” (“Falashas: The Forgotten Jews,” Baltimore Jewish Times, 9 November 1979).

For centuries, the world Jewish community was not even aware of the existence of the Jewish community of Ethiopia in the northern province of Gondar. The miracle of Operation Solomon is only now being fully understood; an ancient Jewish community has been brought back from the edge of government-imposed exile and starvation.

But once they were kings. . . Read more.

Source: jewishvirtuallibrary.org

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

History of Bete-Avraham(Kechene)Jewish community

Background and early history

The Jewish presence in Ethiopia was known to the world hundreds of years ago. Many travelers gave witness to their existence and Jewish emissaries tried to reach the community. The Jewish population during those centuries was clustered primarily in the northern part of the country, mostly in the vicinity of Gondar. Today, these Jews are known as Beta Israel (House of Israel, sometimes called Falasha). Over the last 30 years, the majority of them have emigrated to Eretz Yisrael.

The main purpose of this paper is to introduce a little-known Jewish community, which was once part of Beta Israel. These Jews migrated south nearly 300 years ago and settled in the central part of the region known as North Shewa. Members of this community have been known as Baliij, Teyib, Moreti (named for Moret, the area of North Shewa where they originally settled), Bete Avraham, or, most commonly, as Kechene Jews, named for the area of Addis Ababa where they live now.

The Kechene Jews share ancestral origins with the Beta Israel and observe pre-Talmudic Jewish practices, ... Read more.

 

Source: enszo.org - By Sahle Mengistu, (November 2, 2009)
 
 
 
 

Figures from this community                                                                                                    

Rabbi Capers Funnye

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Leadership and contact information                                                                                   

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Creation date : 26/08/2013 @ 09:39
Last update : 26/08/2013 @ 16:24
Category : Communities
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